The Wolanski Foundation Project

Research

Report no 1 section 4: Performing arts information management

 

ABOUT US

WHAT'S NEW
SITE MAP
 

SEARCHING

MANAGING

LEARNING

LIBRARY

RESEARCH

List of papers

 

CONTACT US

HOME

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

ACTING ON A NEW STAGE:

performing arts information management in New South Wales

 

4 PERFORMING ARTS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT.
 

4.1 The performing arts a definition
 

Although the performing arts have been practised since the days of the Dionysian dance orgies, performing arts - as a collective concept - is a recent invention. Defined by the Macquarie Dictionary as "drama, music, and the dance, collectively", it encompasses opera, radio, film, television, puppetry, circus, vaudeville, variety and other forms of popular entertainment. In evaluating and developing information resources on the performing arts it is advisable to separate them into three main groups: [a] live theatre [b] music [c] film, radio and television.
 

4.2 The performing arts industry
 

Each year in Australia there are close to 20,000 performances by over 1000 theatre, dance and opera companies, orchestras and other groups - not including about 500,000 performances by 5500 popular music groups.
 

This output produces an avalanche of information created, collected and distributed by libraries, networks, publishers and other organisations. The effort associated with managing this information prompts questions about the relative importance and value of specific information, the level of duplicated effort and data, and difficulties associated with discovering and recovering this information across a distributed network.
 

4.3 Library and museum collecting interests
 

In assembling collections of performing arts information, libraries and museums are driven by three distinct interests:

  • Collecting performing arts documentation. This involves the acquisition, processing and preservation of a range of materials created by individuals, performing arts organisations and publishers including reference books and periodicals, press clippings, theatre and concert programs, archival materials and manuscripts.

  • Documenting the performing arts. This includes activities such as database creation and oral history programs that add value, give a more accessible structure or compensate for gaps in assembled primary and secondary source information. It is possible to document the performing arts without creating a physical collection.

  • Presenting performing arts information. Museums, particularly, acquire material as objects for exhibitions as well as for research and study.
    Sometimes collecting institutions embrace all three areas. More often than not, they specialise in one or two areas. In developing policies and strategic direction it is important that organisations understand the differences and the resource implications of each type of collecting activity.

     

Previous section | Next section          

 

Top


 About usWhat's newSite map | Searching  | Managing  | Learning  |  Library |  Research 

  Contact us | Home  

© 2000 The Wolanski Foundation Project

 Email web manager.  URL: http://www.twf.org.au/

Page last updated: 4 January 2000